Tips for traveling with your pets!


ImageWhen traveling often times it can be hard to leave your beloved pet behind. But often times the thought of taking a pet with you on a trip can become very overwhelming. In order to make it less overwhelming it is important to be prepared. Here are some quick tips to make traveling with your pet easy and enjoyable.

1: Book your hotel rooms before you get on the road. When you call us, tell us how big your pet is a how much they weigh. Some hotels have limits on pets and size so you don’t want to be surprised when you show up. Don’t forget most times there is a pet fee associated with the stay and sometimes can depend on those factors.

2: When you are at the hotel be courteous of other guests. When you arrive at the hotel make sure to ask where the dog walking areas are and take them there before visiting your room. Make sure they are a little extra tired so they don’t get restless in the room and start barking.

3: Everyone has different rules in their home, and while it may be ok for your dog to be on furniture on home make sure to bring some extra sheets. We don’t want to charge you for the accidents of a pet, so better to be prepared in advance.

4: It maybe that you don’t have cleaning product with you when you arrive but always ask the front desk right away if your dog has an accident. That way there is no build up of smell in the room.  Often times a dog especially may just be marking their new territory so it is not their fault but again it’s easier to take care of it right away.

5: Make sure you bring anything your pet might need such as potty bags or scratching posts. Don’t forget to clean up after your pet when you walk outside so as to be courteous to other pet owners.

6: As a hotel we would rather you use a towel to clean off your pet after a trip outside then just letting them shake and dry themselves off after a rainy day outside. It’s easier to wash a towel then clean a whole room and again we wouldn’t want to charge you for your pets accidents.

7: If you need to leave your room make sure to secure your pet and use the do not disturb sign provided. It is also a good idea to provide a cell phone number to the front desk in case of emergencies while you are gone. It is important that you do not leave your dog alone all day in your room. We understand you may need to run out but just like you wouldn’t leave them home alone all day please don’t at a hotel either.

8: Most hotels will not clean your room if a pet is alone in the room. And if you are staying for a prolonged time make sure to arrange a cleaning time of your room while you take the dog out.

9: If you are traveling with an out of the ordinary pet make sure to give the staff an extra heads-up. Surprises may make it harder for the staff to deal with later and make your stay harder.

10: And last but not least have fun. 

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Pet Owners Should Prepare for Emergencies


Okay the winter season is upon us.  So far we have been spared the brutal forces of Mother Nature (insert big smiley face here), but winter is not over yet.  It is always best to have a plan set up in advance, especially when you have four legged family members living with you.  Below is a guide to what you should consider.  The Comfort Inn Middletown is pet friendly all year round.

If you evacuate your home, DO NOT LEAVE YOUR PETS BEHIND! Pets most likely cannot survive on their own; and if by some remote chance they do, you may not be able to find them when you return.

Plan for Pet Disaster Needs

  • Identifying shelter. For public health reasons, many emergency shelters cannot accept pets. Find out which motels and hotels in the area you plan to evacuate to allow pets — well in advance of needing them. There are also a number of guides that list hotels/motels that permit pets and could serve as a starting point. Include your local animal shelter’s number in your list of emergency numbers — they might be able to provide information concerning pets during a disaster.
  • Take pet food, bottled water, medications, veterinary records, cat litter/pan, can opener, food dishes, first aid kit and other supplies with you in case they’re not available later. While the sun is still shining, consider packing a “pet survival” kit which could be easily deployed if disaster hits.
  • Make sure identification tags are up to date and securely fastened to your pet’s collar. If possible, attach the address and/or phone number of your evacuation site. If your pet gets lost, his tag is his ticket home. Make sure you have a current photo of your pet for identification purposes.
  • Make sure you have a secure pet carrier, leash or harness for your pet so that if he panics, he can’t escape.

Prepare to Shelter Your Pet

  • Call your local emergency management office, animal shelter, or animal control office to get advice and information.
  • If you are unable to return to your home right away, you may need to board your pet. Find out where pet boarding facilities are located. Be sure to research some outside your local area in case local facilities close.
  • Most boarding kennels, veterinarians and animal shelters will need your pet’s medical records to make sure all vaccinations are current. Include copies in your “pet survival” kit along with a photo of your pet.
  • If you have no alternative but to leave your pet at home, there are some precautions you must take, but remember that leaving your pet at home alone can place your animal in great danger! Confine your pet to a safe area inside — NEVER leave your pet chained outside! Leave them loose inside your home with food and plenty of water.  Remove the toilet tank lid, raise the seat and brace the bathroom door open so they can drink. Place a notice outside in a visible area, advising what pets are in the house and where they are located. Provide a phone number where you or a contact can be reached as well as the name and number of your vet.

During a Disaster

  • Bring your pets inside immediately.
  • Have newspapers on hand for sanitary purposes. Feed the animals moist or canned food so they will need less water to drink.
  • Animals have instincts about severe weather changes and will often isolate themselves if they are afraid. Bringing them inside early can stop them from running away. Never leave a pet outside or tied up during a storm.
  • Separate dogs and cats. Even if your dogs and cats normally get along, the anxiety of an emergency situation can cause pets to act irrationally. Keep small pets away from cats and dogs.
  • In an emergency, you may have to take your birds with you. Talk with your veterinarian or local pet store about special food dispensers that regulate the amount of food a bird is given. Make sure that the bird is caged and the cage is covered by a thin cloth or sheet to provide security and filtered light.

After a Disaster

  • If after a disaster you have to leave town, take your pets with you. Pets are unlikely to survive on their own.
  • In the first few days after the disaster, leash your pets when they go outside. Always maintain close contact. Familiar scents and landmarks may be altered and your pet may become confused and lost. Also, snakes and other dangerous animals may be brought into the area with flood areas. Downed power lines are a hazard.
  • The behavior of your pets may change after an emergency. Normally quiet and friendly pets may become aggressive or defensive. Watch animals closely. Leash dogs and place them in a fenced yard with access to shelter and water.